The American Dream & the DREAM Act

The "American Dream" is rooted in this nation's history of immigration. This country is made up of immigrants from all over the world. Since its founding, America has been seen as the land of opportunity and hope. Millions have come in search of the dream in hopes of a fresh start and a new chance at life. However, the open acceptance of foreigners disappeared over the years. In many cases, these individuals were treated with hostility. As it stands now, over a decade of using immigrants as scapegoats for our economic problems has left this dream buried under the rubble of political tension.

Recent attempts to enact policies more favorable to the immigrant community have surfaced. One such attempt is the DREAM Act (short for Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act). This legislation was first introduced to Congress in 2001. It was designed to allow undocumented immigrant youth of good moral and academic standing to work and live without the threat of deportation looming overhead. In order to qualify under this act, an illegal youth must be able to prove they arrived in the States before the age of 16 and have lived in the country for 5 consecutive years. Furthermore, the individual must have been between 12 and 30 years old when the legislation was established. They must have obtained a high school diploma or its equivalent and have been admitted to a higher education institution.

Although Congress has failed to make a decisive move on and pass the DREAM Act, recent events have given some immigrants renewed hope. President Obama made an announcement and signed an executive order to give the immigrant youth some respite. The President's solution will temporarily suspend deportations of up to 800,000 young illegal immigrants. It has been estimated that as many as 1.4 million children and young adults overall will benefit from this in the end. The President's move was a huge step in the right direction for all those who are impacted.

This announcement made specifically by the Department of Homeland Security does not affirm the act and thereby give legal status to these DREAMers but it does stop the deportation process for two years. This time will give these students the opportunity to apply for a work permit. President Obama stated that the reason behind this move was based on his belief that these young people were Americans in every way except for legal recognition.

The issue of illegal immigrant deportation is a hot topic of debate. The problem is that deportation is a very present reality for many immigrants and not a philosophical debate that can be solved at a later time. If you are an illegal immigrant and are facing deportation, you should hire an attorney right away. If you believe you may qualify under this new decision made by the Obama Administration, you should work with Musa-Obregon & Associates to help you go through the application process. This team will make sure that you are treated fairly throughout the legal process that you must go through. Do not hesitate to call the firm today!

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